Ilex VS Diplodia Tip Blight

Diplodia tip blight is a disease of pines in the Midwest area and the treatment window will soon be upon us. This disease is caused by the fungus Sphaeropsis sapinea and highly effects two needled pines such as Austrian, scotch, mugo, and red, but can infect all evergreens. The disease usually does not kill the tree, but can be very unattractive.

The Diplodia fungus overwinters on infected needles, cones, and within the bark of twigs. Spores are released from spring through late fall. New shoots are infected during the spring from bud break to the end of the growing season. The cones are infected during the spring of the second season, as it takes two years for cones to mature.

Spread of the disease is by the splashing of water, be it rain or over-head irrigation. Because this disease tends to overwinter and spread from infected cones, symptoms are first noticeable on the lower branches, as old cones collect under the tree. Symptoms of infected trees become visible in summer through fall and resemble stunted needle growth and yellowing. Spores can be seen on the needles & old conesΒ as black dots. Because cones are more susceptible to infection, younger, non-cone bearing trees are often symptom-free.

pine

Browning usually starts at the bottom, but can be in other areas.

Black dots on the needles are spores.

Managing Diplodia tip blight focuses on tree health, sanitation, and fungicide applications. Providing proper care such as no overhead watering, mulching, pest management, and fertilization, helps suppress the disease. Removal of diseased cones from the ground helps, but is not practical in large stands of pines. Pruning of infected tips will aesthetically improve the tree, but will do little in the stop of the disease. Severely infected trees should be removed. A fungicide spray program needs to be implemented in the spring and includes at least three applications. Make the first application just prior to bud break (which will be soon!) and make two additional applications at 10-day intervals. It is important to get the first application on the trees before any bud sheaths have broken. If the tree you’re trying to save is of high value, consult a licensed arborist, as the chemicals available to professionals is usually more effective.

© Ilex Farrell

One thought on “Ilex VS Diplodia Tip Blight

  1. Pingback: Monday Memories | Midwestern Plants

Time to fire-up the chair-to-keyboard interface!!!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s