Summer Blooming Flowers 8-23-2014

Happy Saturday to you all!

Click HERE to see what was blooming last year!!

image

Rheum rhabarbarum ‘Victoria’ – (any guesses on this one?) Rhubarb!!

It’s not just for the veggie garden anymore!!

image

This is Chenopodium album or Lamb’s quarters. A weed to most of you, however a tasty spinach-like treat for others like me! My eye was immediately drawn to the purple spots on its leaves. What IS that?!? Seems it has been seen before by peeps on the internet, however, I could not find any info on it aside from, “Yes, it has been confirmed that people do indeed see the purple on the lamb’s ear. That is all.”

image

So, pulling out my best magnifying glass (and the zoom lens for you) I got a little closer. the damage was from the back. This is a fuzzy plant.

image

I’ve also seen this plant with purple leaves at the top.

Just as I was going to give up… I mean, who would put the effort into studying what harms weeds?!? A pesticide specialist and plant geeks like me! I finally found someone who may know what I’m talking about. I’m not sure it tells the whole story, however it talks about this species of plant containing salt bladders in the leaves as a defense mechanism to pests.

image

Perhaps this is the culprit?

So, if the research is true,in summary: the purple is the plants defense mechanism (the salt bladders) that the ‘lil bug has damaged and caused the leaves to turn purple. Sure, final answer.

image

Limenitis arthemis – Red-spotted Purple or White Admiral on Silphium perfoliatum – cup plant

image

Cornus mas – Cornelian cherry or dogwood

The fruit can be used raw, dried or used in preserves. Raw, it has a juicy, acid flavor. The fully ripe fruit has a somewhat plum-like flavor and texture and is very nice eating, but the unripe fruit is rather astringent. It is rather low in pectin and so needs to be used with other fruit when making jam. At one time the fruit was kept in brine and used like olives. The seeds can also be roasted, ground into a powder and used as a coffee substitute. It is very high in vitamin C.

image
Hydrangea paniculata ‘Vanilla Strawberry’ or ‘Rehny’

Still has a bit to go in it’s color changero from white to pink.

image

Clematis alpina white – seed heads

image

Hemerocallis ‘Barbara Mitchell’ – Daylily

image

Hemerocallis ‘Pardon me’ – Daylily

© Ilex – Midwestern Plants

20 thoughts on “Summer Blooming Flowers 8-23-2014

  1. It has just started. Spring rain shower. I will plant a few lettuces and Onions tomorrow and see the flowers start. What you have now, we will have in a month or so. Am I still allowed to eat my rhubarb now that you have elevated it to decorative status?

    Like

    • Yes, continue to enjoy your rhubarb! It’s not just for the back garden any more!
      You’ll have to pick up where I leave off when all my flowers have gone to sleep. 😉
      My post material gets to be slim pickings soon.

      Like

  2. We had rhubarb growing “wild” in our garden in UK. My Dad loved rhubarb pie and custard, that my Mum made. I didn’t like it myself. I hope to see lots of winter pics here in a few months then! Do you get snow there? I miss that. 🙂

    Like

    • Andrew, you’re killing me! 😁
      W/O any research, I’ll guess weavel family, as it seems to have a sucking mouth part.
      I just thought of some winter posts. . Going back to all of my ‘unidentifiables’ and identifying them! Thanks Andrew!

      Like

  3. The discoloration on the chenopodium is leaf damage (and the color is in the leaf, not the bladders). Those bladders are ruptured (they are whiter and less spherical after rupture) so they aren’t giving it the purple color in this case. A lot of pests will cause splotching of purple or red (overproduction of anthocyanin or betacyanin) – though I don’t know exactly what the culprit is (could be insect, fungal, or viral).

    Like

      • No problem at all, glad you stumbled upon it (and Chenopodiums are awesome, though most botanists don’t look twice at them!). Its great that you linked. For awhile, it was the biggest traffic source to my blog.

        Like

        • Thanks! I appreciate your welcoming the link.
          I got into horticulture a bit later in life. .. Sadly, don’t have the time it takes to get a PhD, but would dream to have your youth, curiosity and smarts! 😀 I will continue to educate myself with wonderful writings like yours. Thanks again!

          Like

Time to fire-up the chair-to-keyboard interface!!!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s