Daylight Saving Time – Are We Really?

I posted this last year, however if you missed it, here it is again!! =-)

Fall Back, Spring Ahead!!

s dali

Salvador Dali clock

Daylight saving time was first thought of by Mr. Benjamin Franklin back in 1784, when he suggested that using sunlight was cheaper than using candles. In 1907, William Willett an Englishman, was the next man to further the cause. He passed away before seeing the first county, Germany, embrace daylight saving time in 1916.

Contrary to popular belief, daylight saving time was not wanted by farmers and strongly rallied against it. Farmers never based their days on a clock, but the sun itself. Cows don’t tell time any more than wheat does.

Daylight saving time was implemented in the U.S. during the World Wars to conserve energy, however three weeks after WWII, daylight saving was repealed. States and localities could start and end daylight saving whenever they pleased, a system that Time magazine (an aptly named source) described in 1963 as “a chaos of clocks.” In 1965, there were 23 different pairs of start and end dates in Iowa alone, and St. Paul, Minnesota, even initiated daylight saving two weeks before its twin city, Minneapolis. Passengers on a 35-mile bus ride from Steubenville, Ohio, to Moundsville, West Virginia, passed through seven time changes. Order finally came in 1966 with the enactment of the Uniform Time Act, which standardized daylight saving time from the last Sunday in April to the last Sunday in October, although states had the option of remaining on standard time year-round.

This of course was changed by President Bush in 2007 to be 4 weeks longer…. THANKS, not.

Hawaii, Arizona and the Navajo Nation do not observe daylight saving time. The U.S. territories of American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and the Northern Mariana Islands also remain on standard time year-round. Some Amish communities also choose not to partake in daylight saving time. Around the world, only about one-quarter of the world’s population, in approximately 70 countries, observe daylight saving. Since their daylight hours don’t vary much from season to season, countries closer to the equator have little need to deviate from standard time.

This was all done to try to save resources, energy and money… However, environmental economist Hendrik Wolff, of the University of Washington, found that the Daylight saving did indeed drop lighting and electricity use in the evenings… HOWEVER, higher energy demands during darker mornings completely canceled out the evening gains.

27 thoughts on “Daylight Saving Time – Are We Really?

  1. Great history, but I’m not sure why we still mess with Mother Nature. 🙂 Speaking for myself, as people get older and encounter the inability to have a good night’s sleep, adjusting the clock just makes it worse. LOL It also throws the chickens off which affects egg production and whatever we save on electricity inside gets used to keep a light on in the coop. LOL

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    • I didn’t want to make the post a novel. .. 😉 SO many great points why not to do it.
      However, you are completely correct! The farmer research I did was so one sided against the change, it cracks me up how the rumor (the time change was for them) had turned into such common knowledge for the un-farmer. All the animals are ‘off’ and don’t produce right for a while, farm hands go by the clock, not the sun and we’re charging the farmer more $ for work and lastly, just as you said, who gets a good sleep these days? ? This will mess up many folks sleeping for at least a week, if not more. The only advantage at the moment is that it was ‘fall back’ instead of ‘spring forward’… Don’t even get me started how I feel the Monday after springing forward. Uuuuuuug! 😴😩:o

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  2. In Aust the Northern Territory and Queensland don’t have daylight saving. The rumour had it that Queenslanders were worried that it would fade their curtain more. And can someone explain why, in the USA it puts the chickens of laying. Our chickens here are not clever enough to know that its daylight saving and they just keep on laying like yesterday.

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    • I think the animals are off because us humans follow a clock and schedule things at a certain time. So when we come to clean thier pen, feed them and milk or collect eggs an hour earlier or later, it disrupts thier schedule… enough to throw off production.
      I’m no farmer, I just did the research and someone even commented above that thier chickens are off. My dogs are off, but they don’t add much to the household! 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  3. In Aust the Northern Territory and Queensland don’t have daylight saving. The rumour had it that Queenslanders were worried that it would fade their curtain more. And can someone explain why, in the USA it puts the chickens of laying. Our chickens here are not clever enough to know that its
    daylight saving and they just keep on laying like yesterday.

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  4. I can’t wait until this utterly useless and frustrating, obsolete practice gets trashed once and for all. That UW study pretty much sums it up: any positive value is perfectly offset by its opposite in any modern setting. And the pesky problems of the mere interruptions of the semiannual ritual change only make me madder about it. Took me 11 hours to sleep it off last night after the adding of time to my day. My aging and I, we are not amused. 😉

    Off soapbox now. 🙂

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  7. I loved Fall Back when I was young. One more hour to party or sleep. 🙂 Now that I do not/can not party or sleep, that extra hour is grueling. Up in the middle of the night one hour earlier than usual. 😦 Thank goodness for the computer.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I am honored you spend your insomniac time with me! 😩
      I sometimes wish for insomnia. . I have no problem sleeping. .. at work, at the dinner table, while driving. . Ok, not while I’m driving! I feel like I could get more done if I slept less. I guess every person’s bane is another’s pleasure, right? 😂

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  8. I hate this time changing, we had to do it last weekend. It disturbs Easy 7 stomachs and we have to bear a lot hungry weimaraner songs. I wrote a petition last year to stop this crap but I’ve got no answer by now… probably our ministers have no weimaraners…

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  9. It seems I have read and commented last year,after one year I am in a daylight saving country and I still feel its chaotic, earlier I was around 3 hours behind my home country now its more than 4, hardly suitable time to talk !

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  10. Great painting! It gets really trippy when you (O) have a son in Europe and his daylight savings time starts the week before on this side of the ocean. We postponed our Skype talks, so everyone know what time it is here…and there!

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Time to fire-up the chair-to-keyboard interface!!!

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