Courtship Dance & Serenade – House Finch Style

House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) breed between March and August. Courtship practices can entail some crazy serenading like in the video below. After the female chooses the perfect, bright red suitor, she builds a nest, which is made of any soft material available. A pair can lay as many as three clutches of eggs in one summer, however they usually can only successfully raise two. The female lays 3 to 6 bluish or greenish-white eggs, with each egg weighing approximately 2.4 g that take about 14 or 15 days to hatch. The female incubates the brood and feeds the naked chicks for five days, then both parents take over feeding.

The nestlings leave the nest when they are 13 to 20 days old. The male continues to feed the fledglings for about two more weeks. (It’s actually quite comical to see the ragged-feathered dad with three youngsters in tow, all screaming FEED ME!!!) The female avoids this nonsense and begins to build a new nest so the cycle can continue…


© Ilex – Midwestern Plant Girl

23 thoughts on “Courtship Dance & Serenade – House Finch Style

  1. These little male birds of all species have to work to get the girl. lol Quite funny and entertaining to watch the courtship. Nice job capturing your video. You have entertainment right out of your window, how nice.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m pretty sure Finch are very creative nesters. I had a video a while back of a nest in a Christmas container display. They were at eye level, by a door to a winery. Lots of folks walking by. Surely they were used to it and a pretty safe spot, despite the traffic!

      Like

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