Two-Spotted Stink Bug ~ Perillus bioculatus

imageI saw this little guy climbing around my Veronica ‘Purplicious’ and of course he’d be turned into a post!

Folks, I’d like to introduce Mr. Red and Black Two-Spotted Stink Bug or Perillus bioculatus for short. Peri here is a native North America soldier bug, and is a part of the Pentatomidae family with all the other stink bugs.

There are generally 2-3 generations of these guys a season, with the last generation hibernating over winter. Females can lay up to 100 eggs usually grouped in 10-15 on branches.

I won’t make you wait any longer for the obvious answer to the question floating in your head. YES! They do smell if you step on them or threaten them. So, basically, when he gets scared, he farts. I feel his pain….

Peri’s favorite food is the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata). He doesn’t care how this beetle is being served up, sweet young larvae or adult.. . He eats them all. Don’t get me wrong. Peri won’t let a meal pass him by. No. He’s not a fussy eater and will plunge his sharp beak into any nearby meal, excrete some digestive fluid, and enjoy a bug juice cocktail.

The shape of the shield makes me think of cops out walking their beats. And these guys do serve and protect… POTATOES! These guys have been mass released near potato crops to help eradicate the potato bugs.

So, if you’re a fan of the spud, don’t give this guy too much flack about dropping SBD’s. He’s your ‘potato savior’!


© Ilex – Midwestern Plant Girl

30 thoughts on “Two-Spotted Stink Bug ~ Perillus bioculatus

  1. Thank you for that. I have been finding various types of stink bugs all over this country. In Western North Carolina, as if the lady bug plague wasn’t enough (Christmas tree industry), they’ve added a North Carolina variety of stink bug that is huge, brown, and….stinks to holy heaven if you squash one. So the only thing to do is to gently coax her into a designated plastic thing and tiptoe outside, then try to dump her out (they are really good at sticking to things) or just lay the plastic thing on the ground and hope she smells something good to eat and leaves on her own, rather than making the plastic thing her house for a while.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: Leaf-Footed Bug ~ Leptoglossus oppositus | Midwestern Plants

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