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Vodka Ice Cream is a Thing Now. And It Will Get You Smashed

Be still my heart! Someone has mastered the art of vodka ice cream 😁 I know many folks that would love to get their hands on this stuff. We need to help them branch out from only selling in Maryland. For now, road trip anyone? 😉

The Oily Guru

The liquor industry has long sought new ways to package their distilled spirits. While the demand for traditional alcohol remains strong, upstarts in the industry have a hard time competing. Perhaps that’s why there is now a new trend: alcoholic ice cream. Looking for a cool way to end summer? Try some vodka ice-cream.

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Or, as the company says: “chill out, eat vodka.” ArcticBuzz has launched a line of ice cream that combines flavors like cookies and cream and key lime pie with the kick of vodka. The Baltimore company has figured out how to keep the mixture from separating, which is a challenge because of the low freezing point of vodka.

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“If you have ever put a bottle of vodka in the freezer,” ArcticBuzz writes, “you know the vodka wins every time. After working with several different recipes and numerous tastings, ArcticBuzz has cracked the code and delivers homemade…

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I’m Ready for the Eclipse

I AM IRON WOMAN

I think this may be my first selfie! At least my first POSTED selfie 😉 It wasn’t very easy to pull off, since I could not see my phone screen through the darkened welding helmet screen. Yes, it is perfectly fine to view the eclipse with a welding helmet, as long as it creates at least a setting of “Shade 12”. This helmet provides between ‘Shade 12 – 16’, so I’m well covered. Sadly, the sky may also be well covered also 😛 I’m in northern Illinois and we have a storm going just south of us… Hopefully, it won’t bring clouds with it.

I hope everyone gets out and at least tries to view the eclipse. The next full one to cross the U.S. will be in 2024.

 

© Ilex ~ Midwestern Plant Girl

Dog Tick ~ Dermacentor variabilis

My poor husband was attacked by a dog tick. He wasn’t anywhere that was a tick haven… He was in our yard. We do live near a forest preserve and have our share of wild furries sharing our space. Luckily, it’s not the tick vector for Lyme’s Disease. Granted, there’s other things he might be able to look forward to, like Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever and Bartonella. Yeah!

The best way to prevent a tick borne illness is to avoid tick bites. If you’re going to visit wooded areas or areas with tall grass, follow these precautions to help prevent tick bites and the risk of disease:

  • Wear light-colored, long-sleeved shirts, long trousers, boots or sturdy shoes and a head covering (ticks will jump from trees). Tuck your pants into your socks. For extra protection, tape the area where your pants and socks meet.
  • Apply insect repellent to your clothes containing 10 percent to 30 percent DEET. Use repellents containing permethrin to treat any exposed skin. Be sure to wash treated skin after coming indoors. Always follow label directions; do not misuse or overuse repellents. Always supervise children when using repellents.
  • Try to walk in the center of trails so weeds do not brush against you. If your camping area is full of leaf litter, a favorite place for ticks to hide, be sure to sit on chairs, not on the ground.
  • Check yourself every two to three hours for ticks. Most ticks don’t attach right away and rarely transmit disease until they have been attached four or more hours. Don’t forget about your fur friend! Check them for ticks, also.
  • Remove any tick you find promptly and properly! A tick’s mouth parts are barbed and can remain embedded which could lead to infection at the bite site. Do not try to burn the tick with a match, cover it with petroleum jelly or nail polish. Do not use bare hands to remove the tick because tick secretions may carry disease. The best way to remove a tick is to grasp it firmly with tweezers as close to the skin as possible and gently, but firmly, pull it straight out. Do not twist or jerk the tick. If tweezers are not available, grasp the tick with a piece of tissue or cloth or whatever can be used as a barrier between your fingers and the tick. If you want to have the tick identified, put it in a small vial of alcohol.
  • Wash the bite area thoroughly with soap and water, then apply an antiseptic to the bite site.
  • If you have an unexplained illness with fever, contact your doctor. Be sure to tell the doctor you’ve been bitten by a tick recently.

© Ilex ~ Midwestern Plant Girl

Soulmate

Push aside your long brown hair, through strong thick fingers, across your bronzed face, from your hazel eyes, dripping with confidence. Your luminous gaze flushes my skin, lost in your stare, heart full of anticipation, I turn to see only you across the crowded room. Reach out your hand, draw me into you through melodic verses from upon the stage, you touch my soul. Electricity from your touch, feelings from your heart, true deep emotions filled all my voids, melt us together. Torn by fate, split by lightning, thrown into endless searches, apart too long, our hearts join with pleasurous pain. Subliminal messages only you understand, knowing my thoughts, always sensing your devotion, feeling my passion, true soulmates.

Ilex ~ Midwestern Plant Girl

The Big Headed Ground Beetle ~ Scarites subterraneus

I’ve find these gals in my basement occasionally, wondering how she burrowed her way in. Unfortunately or fortunately, she will get returned to the great outdoors to enjoy her life outside of my basement. I placed her on the driveway to get some shots, however she was not feeling the love for the camera and quickly made her way to the nearby mulch.

These are called The Big Headed Ground Beetle, however it’s not really their heads that are large, it just looks that way because of their chests being connected to their heads. Personally, I think they should be called the Sir Mix-A-Lot Beetle… As in, Little in the middle, butt she’s got much back!!!

Adults are about ¾” inch (20 mm) long, shiny black, with antennae slightly paler and very broad, large jaws. They are commonly found in mulch, under stones, around illuminated areas at night, in basements and in damp soil. When discovered, they may play dead, hoping that their thick exoskeleton will protect them. They are easily picked up by their butts, as they can’t turn their menacing mandibles around to bite you. Although these gals are capable of giving a painful bite, the bites rarely break the skin or are medically harmful.

These gals are considered very beneficial, as they eat nuisance insects in the soil as larvae and adults. These girls like the night life and generally only hunt in the evenings.

 

© Ilex ~ Midwestern Plant Girl