Tag Archive | cancer

CBD Oil – A Newbies Lesson in Review

Cannabidiol (CBD) works through a number of complex mechanisms. Studies have indicated that CBD has analgesic, anti-convulsant, anti-psychotic and neuroprotective effects. This means that sufferers of chronic pain, anxiety, nausea, rheumatoid arthritis, cancer, schizophrenia, diabetes, autoimmune diseases, PTSD, alcoholism, epilepsy, strokes and cardiovascular disease have another aid in their corner.

CBD’s use to treat epilepsy has caused quite a stir among folks here recently. The video below brings hope to many people.

In short, unlike THC (9tetrahydrocannabinol), CBD does not bind to the CB1 or CB2 cannabinoid receptors, which is why it does not produce THC-like psychedelic affects.

Here in the USA, the FDA has ruled CBD to be treated as a nutritional supplement. As such, all supplements are required to have at least a basic nutritional label on them. Along with nutritional information, labels also require a suggested serving size. Because all manufacturers are required to put some form of serving size on the label, it gets confusing when it comes to dosing. This is a huge disservice to anyone trying to figure out how much CBD to take. Most people read the label and figure whatever it says is how much they should take. This couldn’t be further from the truth. The servings chosen are either arbitrary or can be helpful to some degree, however not necessarily any indication of how much CBD you should take. For instance, on many brands, 10 drops is a serving size and how many milligrams of CBD will be indicated. This is because it is important to know how many milligrams of CBD you are taking. For instance, you determine that you need 10 milligrams of CBD. The label indicates 10 drops has 5mg of CBD. You would take 20 drops to get 10mg.

CONDITION 2 – 25 LBS. 26 – 45 LBS 46 – 85 LBS 86 – 150 LBS 151 – 210 LBS 241+ LBS
MILD 4.5mg 6 mg 9 mg 12 mg 18 mg 22.5 mg
MEDIUM 6 mg 9 mg 12 mg 15 mg 22.5 mg 30 mg
SEVERE 9 mg 12 mg 15 mg 18 mg 27 mg 45 mg

 

An effective dosage can range from as little as a few milligrams of CBD-enriched oil to a gram or more. Begin with a small dose and take a few small doses over the course of the day rather than one big dose. Use the same dose and ratio for several days. Note the effects and if necessary, adjust the ratio or amount. Cannabis compounds have biphasic properties, which mean that low and high doses of the same substance can produce opposite effects. Like alcohol, small doses tend to stimulate; large doses sedate. “Less is more” is often the case with respect to cannabis therapy.

For instance: I found the best dose for my 151-210 pound frame, treating anxiety (medium condition), would be about 20-25 mg a day. I break it up by taking about 10 mg in the morning and the 10-15 mg balance at night. The lower dose in the morning is treated like coffee by my body, and the larger dose at night works like warm milk… allowing me a great night’s sleep.

Things to look for when choosing a CBD oil:

  • Cannabis Not Industrial Hemp: Compared to whole plant cannabis, hemp is typically low in cannabinoid content. A huge amount of hemp is required to extract a small amount of CBD, raising the risk of contaminants because hemp is a bioaccumulator, meaning it draws toxins from the soil. The balanced profile of whole plant cannabis enhances the therapeutic benefits of the CBD and THC.
  • How it’s made: a 10% CBD oil that has been CO2 extracted and processed without heat so it maintains a full cannabinoid and terpene profile, is better than a 50% oil cheaply extracted with butane and heated excessively so it has no more terpenes left. Also, many products are made with isolate, which is 99%. Very high %, but it is an isolate so it’s missing the rest of the “whole plant” compounds and therefore, likely to be limited in effects.
  • Easy to Read Labels: Look for clear labels showing the quantity, ratio of CBD, THC per dose (if applicable), a manufacturing date and lastly, a batch number.
  • Lab Testing: Look for products that are tested for consistency, verified as free of mold, pesticides, bacteria, solvent residues and other contaminants.
  • Quality Ingredients: Select products with quality ingredients. No corn syrup, GMOs, trans fats, and artificial additives.
  • CBD and THC-Rich Products: For maximum therapeutic impact, (If living in a Marijuana legal state) choose products that include CBD and THC, the main psychoactive component of cannabis. CBD and THC enhance each other’s therapeutic benefits, that’s why Mother Nature put them together 😉
  • Safe Extraction: Avoid products extracted with toxic solvents like BHO (Butane honey oil), propane, hexane or other hydrocarbons. Solvent residues are especially dangerous for immune-compromised patients. Look for products that use a safer method of extraction like supercritical CO2.

Here are some of the brands I tried and my notes. In the end, Diamond CBD will be getting my business.

PRODUCT PRICE SIZE MG TASTE RATING
Honey B $30.00 1 oz / 30 ml 100 mg Berry My starter bottle. I really liked the mild taste. Only 3 flavors.
Tasty Drops $60.00 1 oz / 30ml 300 mg Berry Thick black oil. Did not like the thick ‘hemp’ taste.
American Shaman $60.00 .5 oz / 15ml 300 mg Grape Strong hemp flavor, but grape covered well.
Pure Science Lab $60.00 .5 oz / 15ml 400 mg Vanilla Horrible taste. Lingered for hours. Required refrigeration.
Diamond CBD $70.00 .5 oz / 15ml 350 mg Cherry Best tasting so far. Nice dropper. Have different flavors on order.

© Ilex ~ Midwestern Plant Girl

Magic ‘Psilocybin’ Mushrooms Help Cancer Patients With Depression & Anxiety

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I wish there weren’t so many laws telling us what we can and cannot do to our own bodies…

Scientists have recently completed more studies concerning cancer patients and end of life care using ‘Magic Mushrooms’.

Psilocybin is a naturally occurring compound that is produced by more than 200 species mushrooms, collectively known as “Psilocybin mushrooms”. The most potent are members of the genus Psilocybe, such as P. azurescens, P. semilanceata, and P. cyanescens, but psilocybin has also been isolated from about a dozen other genera.

I read this write-up from Science Daily:
Improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of cancers in recent years have led to a marked increase in patients’ physical survival rates. While doctors can treat the physical disease, what is not well understood is how best to address the psychological needs of patients with cancer.

In addition to the physical pain associated with cancer, many patients also experience psychologically harmful symptoms of anxiety, depression, anger, and denial. Social isolation, in addition to hopelessness, helplessness and loss of independence, has also been associated with significant psychological suffering in patients coping with advanced-stage cancer.

A recently published book chapter “Use of the Classic Hallucinogen Psilocybin for Treatment of Existential Distress Associated with Cancer,” reviews the potential of a novel psychoactive drug, psilocybin, in alleviating the psychological and spiritual distress that often accompanies a life-threatening cancer diagnosis.

The chapter, published in Psychological Aspects of Cancer: A Guide to Emotional and Psychological Consequences of Cancer, Their Causes, and Their Management, was co-written by Anthony P. Bossis, PhD, Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Radiology, and Medicine at the New York University College of Dentistry (NYUCD) and Langone Medical Center.

The hallucinogen treatment model with psilocybin has been shown to induce a mystical or spiritual experience and is a unique therapeutic approach to reduce the anxiety of terminal cancer patients.

“Mystical or peak consciousness states in cancer patients have been associated with a number of benefits including improved psychological, spiritual, and existential well-being,” said Dr. Bossis.

Psilocybin (a serotonergic psychoactive agent) is a naturally occurring active component of many species of mushrooms, and is rapidly metabolized to psilocin, a highly potent activator of serotonin receptors. In addition to receiving the psilocybin compound, patients enrolled in the study also receive psychological preparation prior to the psilocybin dosing followed by a brief series of integrative psychotherapeutic sessions.

The chapter includes a clinical case vignette of a patient in the ongoing Psilocybin Cancer Anxiety Study at the Bluestone Center for Clinical Research. Participants undergo two drug administration sessions in which psilocybin is administered on one occasion and a placebo on the other.

“The primary objective of this phase I, double-blind, controlled pilot study is to assess the efficacy of psilocybin administration on psychosocial distress, with the specific primary outcome variable being anxiety associated with advanced and/or recurrent cancer,” said Bossis. “Secondary outcome measures will look at the effect of psilocybin on symptoms of pain perception, depression, existential/psychospiritual distress, attitudes toward illness, quality of life, and spiritual/mystical states of consciousness,” said Bossis.

The clinical vignette describes a patient who, over the course of three years, experienced extreme fatigue, pain, overall body aches, discomfort and psychological distress due to cancer and intensive biweekly chemotherapy. The patient became increasingly anxious and depressed and was enrolled in two study sessions; in one he received psilocybin and the other placebo. Despite continuing the arduous chemotherapy schedule, suffering from illness, and undergoing additional surgical procedures, the patient continued to report a marked improvement in attitude, coping, and mood 18 weeks after his session and stated, “my quality of life is dramatically improved,” the patient said.

Stephen Ross, MD, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the NYU School of Medicine and Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Radiology, and Medicine at the NYUCD is the principal investigator for the study; Dr. Bossis and Jeffrey Guss, MD, Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry are co-principal investigators.

The co-authors of the chapter were: Charles S. Grob, MD, Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and Roland R. Griffiths, PhD, Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science and Neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University.

The Psilocybin Cancer Anxiety Study was also recently highlighted in a News article, “Opening Doors of Perception: Psychedelic Drugs and End-of-Life Care” in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

“The emotional, spiritual and existential distress that can often accompany a diagnosis of cancer often goes unidentified and untreated in cancer patients. Patients who have benefited from psilocybin clinical research have reported less anxiety, improved quality of life, enhanced psychological and spiritual well-being, and a greater acceptance of the life-changes brought on by cancer. It is a welcome development that this promising and novel clinical research model utilizing psilocybin has begun to gain clinical and academic attention,” Bossis notes.

The Psilocybin Cancer Anxiety Study is currently recruiting additional subjects. To enroll or learn more, please visit BluestoneCenter.org or http://www.nyucanceranxiety.org/

New York University. (2013, January 31). Potential of psilocybin to alleviate psychological and spiritual distress in cancer patients is revealed ScienceDaily Retrieved December 1, 2016 from http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130131095040.htm

Welcome Little Violet – Viola sororia

imageI saw this little guy on the top of my south facing swale. It gets a bunch of sun and tends to warm up quickly there. These beauties are really low and were tucked protectively into the grass. If you put weed killer on your lawn in the spring, you’ll miss out on having them bless you in the spring.

There are many health benefits of violets. Leaves of violets contain twice as much vitamin C as the same weight of an orange and over twice the amount of vitamin A when compared with spinach. Bam! Early Native Americans have used violets for treating different cancers and the American Natural Cancer Institute has recognized this and have joined forces. Violets may also be useful in the therapy of disorders related to an overactive immune system.

Here are a few spring tea recipes including violets:

Nutritious Tea
Use equal amounts of the dried leaves of nettle, dandelion, red clover, violet and mint.

Mineral Rich Tea
Steep violet leaves with alfalfa, horsetail, oatstraw, red clover, hawthorn leaf and flower, chamomile, and raspberry leaves. This tea is jam-packed with vitamin C, vitamin A, iron, and calcium.

Relaaaaax
Combine violet leaves with blue vervain, linden leaf and linden flower with elderberry flower.

These cutie-faces are native east of Kansas. They are the state flower for Illinois, Rhode Island, New Jersey, and Wisconsin.

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© Ilex – Midwestern Plant Girl