Tag Archive | evergreen

Winter Display Containers 2017

It’s That time of year again! Winter pot time!!!

We pre-fab these at the office and the crews deliver these to the client’s homes. You can skip many of the next steps if you already have a prepared pot of soil. We make them this way so we don’t have to stand outside and do it! I think this almost falls into that category of, ‘Lazy man works the hardest!’ Ha!

       

We use nursery pots that closely fit the size of our client’s containers. Cut a plastic sheet to fit over the bottom holes. This slows or stops the water from draining and helps freeze the display in place. Next, add florist foam to the middle for stability of the larger ‘thriller’ items, as these could be rather large birch poles. Then fill the rest of the pot with a 50/50 soil/sand mixture. Be sure to really stuff that soil into the pot. The better packed soil helps hold the display in place from precipitation, the weight of snow and wind.

The design is the standard, Thriller, Filler & Spiller! The Thriller is that one large sprig/evergreen, center piece, or for this season, mostly sticks. Filler are those mid-range sized pieces of evergreen, or other material that is generally wider and less tall that the thriller material. Spiller is just that, floppy evergreen, weaker-stemmed items that hang over the edge of the pot.

A few often overlooked hints and tips:

  • Fresh cut ALL of your greens right before sticking into the pot. It does make a huge difference as to how long the greens will stay green and especially how long the holly berries will stay on the branches.
  • Be sure where you want to push the stems into the foam, because the foam will break if you change your mind too often.
  • Before using hydrangea, pre-treat them to a blast of clear spray paint to help them keep their form.
  • If your display becomes covered in snow, be sure to clear it by hitting the branches in an UPWARD motion. If you push too hard on them downward, they may break. A broom does a great job.
  • After you have created your masterpiece, wet the display down well. It will freeze and hold all the stuff in place. It will also give some moisture to the cuttings.

Want to check out some previous years containers? Click away!!!  2016 ~ 2015 ~ 2014 ~ 2013

I will have a couple of DYI|Step-by-step tutorials coming: However, for now, here’s a GOLD one and a SILVER one.

     

      

      

© Ilex ~ Midwestern Plant Girl

 

Evergreen Winter Seasonal Pots 2016

It’s that time again!! Wiiiinter pots!!

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We pre-fab these at the office and the crews deliver these to the client’s homes. You can skip many of the next steps if you already have a prepared pot of soil. We make them this way so we don’t have to stand outside and do it! I think this almost falls into that category of, ‘Lazy man works the hardest!’ Ha!

We use nursery pots that closely fit the size of our client’s containers. Cut a plastic sheet to fit over the bottom holes. This slows or stops the water from draining and helps freeze the display in place. Next, add florist foam to the middle for stability of the larger ‘thriller’ items, as these could be rather large birch poles. Then fill the rest of the pot with a 50/50 soil/sand mixture. Be sure to really stuff that soil into the pot. The better packed soil helps hold the display in place from precipitation, the weight of snow and wind.

The design is the standard, Thriller, Filler & Spiller! The Thriller is that one large sprig/evergreen, center piece, or for this season, mostly sticks. Filler are those mid-range sized pieces of evergreen, or other material that is generally wider and less tall that the thriller material. Spiller is just that, floppy evergreen, weaker-stemmed items that hang over the edge of the pot.

A few often overlooked hints and tips:

  • Fresh cut ALL of your greens right before sticking into the pot. It does make a huge difference as to how long the greens will stay green and especially how long the holly berries will stay on the branches.
  • After you have created your masterpiece, wet the display down well. It will freeze and hold all the stuff in place. It will also give some moisture to the cuttings.
  • Before using hydrangea, pre-treat them to a blast of clear spray paint to help them keep their form.
  • If your display becomes covered in snow, be sure to clear it by hitting the branches in an UPWARD motion. If you push too hard on them downward, they may break. A broom does a great job.

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© Ilex ~ Midwestern Plant Girl

Evergreen Holiday Pot in Bucket

After making my gold / brown pot for my front door, my husband loved it so much, he wanted me to make one for his boss. Oakey-dokey! I can do that!!

If you’ve already read my DYI post for my last pot, most of this post is going to be plagiarized from that one… If you don’t want to read how to put this together, just look at the photos =-)

Instead of me using a liner for his pot, as I did not know if he had an existing pot to use, I used a shiny steel bucket. This time I did not have any soil, so I filled the bottom with a few rocks and cut the foam to fit in the bucket. This serves three purposes, better water collection for the greens at first, then for it to freeze the greens in place with little expansion, and lastly, a heavy base so the design won’t fall over in the wind and snow.

First, place your sticks (birch poles here), or the largest diameter things first. You’ll know right away if your foam is going to hold, nothing like making your whole design, and then placing your sticks and busting the foam!! Arrrg! >:-O Yes, I have learned the hard way!

Think about where your pot will be displayed. Will they be on the sides of your door? On top of a pier? On top of your mailbox? Or on just one side of the door, like this one. I set my sticks a bit to one side (the back) of my pot, so more bling can be added to the front and sides. If you’re pot will be able to be viewed from all angles, I’d center them. If you’re having one on either side of your door, I would mirror-image the bling on 3 sides of the pot.

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I like to get a ring around the bottom next, as you can be sure that there is a sufficient amount of greens around the bottom. Again, think of where your pot will be displayed. This one will be on the ground, so it will be viewed by looking down on it. Some folks have piers or taller areas where their pots are going, these pots will need to have a nice lower row, as this is what you may see when viewing up at it. I’m using Scott’s Pine for my bottom. I love this material, as it already has pine cones attached! Don’t worry if it sticks up a bit, as you add more to the center, it will flatten out.

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My next filler is a variegated boxwood. I love the variety of colors it brings to the mix. I’m not a huge fan of a straight green pot, although I can appreciate the simplicity. Don’t fill it to the brim, there needs to be room for other ingredients, and you can always add more boxwood later.

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Next I added some magnolia. It will take up a lot of space, which is always good as you will save on materials because of it. After that comes the eucalyptus and dried hydrangea. I usually harvest these (for free!) from the large limelight we have in the yard at work. If your display will be out in the elements, I would give them a quick spray of clear enamel. This will stick them together and help stop the wind and snow from taking their toll. I also used grape vine balls sprayed lightly with white paint, for some natural-looking balls to bring together the round, flashy ornaments that are the next step.

imageAnd now for the fun part…. the bling! The large balls were ornaments that I removed the hanger from and stuck a stick in the hole. You may need to use hot glue to steady it on the stick. The small ones came in a one-piece clump, which I cut apart. I then added the little silver glitter sticks. Voilà!

I chose to go with a silver / white theme here, as it can stay out past Christmas without looking too tacky. If I had to total my materials here, I’d guess-ta-mate it would be about $50.00 without the pot. Right now, Hobby Lobby has all their Christmas stuff on sale for 50% off! I was also able to pick-up the white/mirrored ornaments at the dollar store, SCORE!!

Happy Creating!!

 

 

 

 

 


© Ilex – Midwestern Plant Girl

Maxwell Falls Trail – Evergreen Colorado

We decided to give Maxwell Falls Upper Trail a try. This was considered an easy hike, as it only gains about 644 feet in about 5 miles. We did not do the lower part, where the water falls are, however they would have been frozen now anyway.

This was a pretty even hike, mostly through forests, to then open up to scenic views.

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Upper Trailhead

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No Shooting!

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Mouse attack!

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Creeping Juniper

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I’m practicing my macro photography. I had an awesome, professional photographer with me today!

Chris is in lead. Figures the smoker is leaving us in the dust!

Chris is in lead. Figures the smoker is leaving us in the dust!

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This scotch pine does some yoga!

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Our view to the south, I think.

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How to Create an Outdoor Winter Pot

My office for the next few days.
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This week kicked off the winter pot brigade! It generally slows down enough for me to help make the 100 or so winter pots my company installs before Thanksgiving. Out of the 100 or so we make, about 10 are Christmas containers, but we like to use the nondescript term of ‘winter pots’, because 98% of our client base is Jewish. No red, no berries, no sparkles, no holly, no bows, no garland, nothing related to Christmas! These limitations aren’t that difficult, there are many other options available. I like a non-Christmas pot myself, as it can be displayed after Christmas without looking like you were lazy in removing the holiday displays. Sometimes I use something easily removable such as lighted sticks, or sprigs of red berries that can be removed from the display and the pot can continue on into January and beyond.

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We pre-fab these at the office and the crews deliver these to the client’s homes. You can skip many of the next steps if you already have a prepared pot of soil. We make them this way so we don’t have to stand outside and do it! I think this almost falls into that category of, ‘Lazy man works the hardest!’ Ha!

We use nursery pots that closely fit the size of our client’s containers. Cut a plastic sheet to fit over the bottom holes. This slows or stops the water from draining and helps freeze the display in place. Next, add florist foam to the middle for stability of the larger ‘thriller’ items, as these could be rather large birch poles. Then fill the rest of the pot with a 50/50 soil/sand mixture. Be sure to really stuff that soil into the pot. The better packed soil helps hold the display in place from precipitation, the weight of snow and wind.
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Copyright – Ilex Farrell

November is the Time to Protect Shrubs for Winter

November is the time for Midwesterners to protect their vulnerable shrubs from winter damage. A little protection from cold winds and snow is all that many cold-sensitive shrubs require. There are several methods available to provide shelter.

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Smaller shrubs like rhododendrons, will benefit from using fresh cut branches of conifers [spruce, pine]. Direct the thick end into the ground near the crown of the plant, and intermingle the branches together. This will provide a windbreak and help stop branch breakage from the weight of snow. If the shrub is taller than the conifer branches, tie them together at different heights to protect the whole shrub.

Another method of providing protection is to use horticultural fleece, plastic, wind-break netting or commercially made covers like below. This method should be used on all late-season planted evergreens, as they may not have developed an adequate root system yet, and can dry out from harsh winds.

http://www.amazon.com/Fabric-Protective-Outdoor-Holiday-Lights/dp/B005UNZVN8

Lighted covers at Amazon.com

http://www.thegreenhead.com/2008/11/snowman-bush-covers.php

Snowmen Bush Covers

To wrap shrubs, insert three stout canes or rods around the shrub and wrap with several layers of protective fabric. Be sure to secure the fabric to the ground. Do not fill the area with leaves, this will promote fungus growth and other problems.

Smaller alpines or plants such as helibores, can be protected using bricks and a piece of glass or clear plastic. Place bricks on the sides of the plant, place glass on top with some type of weight on top to prevent glass from moving. Another idea is to use a spare cloche, but prop-up an end for some circulation.

Some evergreens don’t need wind protection as much as they need to be protected from heavy snowfalls. One heavy snow can break branches and permanently disfigure the plant. Tie shrubs branches loosely in an upright position.

winter protected shrubs

For established or larger shrubs that don’t need wind protection, remove heavy snows with a broom. Be sure to hit the branches swinging upward to pop the snow up, as pushing down may break the branches.

BTW – I drew these myself!  =-)

Ilex VS. Winter Damage

Winter burn happens when plants dry out during the winter. Even during the colder months, evergreens continue to lose water vapor through their needles, which are modified leaves. The plant attempts to replace the water by pulling it from the roots. However, when the ground is frozen, the roots cannot absorb enough water to supply it to the dry needles. If the weather turns breezy, warm and sunny while the ground is still frozen (like today, in the Midwest), evaporation from the needles increases and water cannot be replaced fast enough. Discolored, brown or burnt -looking foliage may start to appear when this happens. In fact, winter burn indicators typically develop during warm weather in late winter and early spring.

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Winter burn on picea glauca ‘nana’ – Dwarf White Spruce

Winter damage is often misdiagnosed as a disease or as damage from excessively cold temperatures. The damage which starts at the tips, is brown or rust-colored and generally on the side of the plant facing the sun and/or the side exposed to the wind, where the rate of evaporation from the needles or leaves is greatest.

Winter burn can be more prevalent in years in which the ground freezes early before plants are acclimated to cold weather or when there is little snow. Without snow cover or mulch to insulate the soil, the ground can freeze more deeply. Although this is not always true, as the amount of snow did not matter this year because of the frigid temperatures, the ground is still frozen about 2 feet down.

Light pruning can remove the burn, however some lazy gardeners wait for the needles to completely dry and brush them loose / let them fall a bit later in the season.

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Only the outer needles are effected on the sunny / windward side of the plant.

Winter Burn Management Strategies

Water well in fall: One inch per week or saturate to the depth of 12” to 18” inches. Watering should be continued through late autumn into early winter as long as the ground is not frozen.

Mulch: Use mulch around the plant so the entire root zone is covered. This will reduce moisture loss.

Build a barrier to wind. A burlap barrier can deflect wind from the plant.

Promote good culture. Monitor the amount of moisture in the spring when the plant is coming out of a period of frozen ground, and low moisture availability. Water as needed if the rainfall is less than an inch per week.

Many broad-leave evergreens such as: holly, boxwood, yews and rhododendrons will also have some winter burn this year.
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Karen's azalea

© Ilex – Midwestern Plants

November is the Time to Protect Shrubs for Winter

November is the time for Midwesterners to protect their vulnerable shrubs from winter damage. A little protection from cold winds and snow is all that many cold-sensitive shrubs require. There are several methods available to provide shelter.

Scan_Pic0003

Smaller shrubs like rhododendrons, will benefit from using fresh cut branches of conifers [spruce, pine]. Direct the thick end into the ground near the crown of the plant, and intermingle the branches together. This will provide a windbreak and help stop branch breakage from the weight of snow. If the shrub is taller than the conifer branches, tie them together at different heights to protect the whole shrub.

Another method of providing protection is to use horticultural fleece, plastic, wind-break netting or commercially made covers like below. This method should be used on all late-season planted evergreens, as they may not have developed an adequate root system yet, and can dry out from harsh winds.

http://www.amazon.com/Fabric-Protective-Outdoor-Holiday-Lights/dp/B005UNZVN8

Lighted covers at Amazon.com

http://www.thegreenhead.com/2008/11/snowman-bush-covers.php

Snowmen Bush Covers

To wrap shrubs, insert three stout canes or rods around the shrub and wrap with several layers of protective fabric. Be sure to secure the fabric to the ground. Do not fill the area with leaves, this will promote fungus growth and other problems.

Smaller alpines or plants such as helibores, can be protected using bricks and a piece of glass or clear plastic. Place bricks on the sides of the plant, place glass on top with some type of weight on top to prevent glass from moving. Another idea is to use a spare cloche, but prop-up an end for some circulation.

Some evergreens don’t need wind protection as much as they need to be protected from heavy snowfalls. One heavy snow can break branches and permanently disfigure the plant. Tie shrubs branches loosely in an upright position.

winter protected shrubs

For established or larger shrubs that don’t need wind protection, remove heavy snows with a broom. Be sure to hit the branches swinging upward to pop the snow up, as pushing down may break the branches.

© Ilex Farrell ~ Midwestern Plant Girl