Tag Archive | health

Doggy CCL Knee Surgery and Recovery Time Activities

One Sunday, a few weeks ago, we noticed Breck was limping. The first thing we thought was that he had gotten stung in the foot by a drunk wasp that had been dining on the fallen apples near my back door. Nope, no sting locations. We felt if he had any broken bones, nope. No dog squeaks after pulling it out and bending. We figured we’d get him into the veterinarian that next Monday.

Our appointment was at 10 AM, and in less than 3 minutes, he was diagnosed with a cruciate ligament tear in his right, rear knee. A CCL is the same as an ACL in humans. In a nutshell, its the tendon that holds the femur (thigh bone) to the tibia (calf bone) and prevents the femur from sliding forward off the tibia. Clearly, dogs are made a bit different. All the vet needed to do was to push his femur back from his tibia and note the amount of ‘shift’ it made. Too much shift for it to still be attached.

Breck in the doughnut-of-shame

She offered up three options, do nothing, or two types of surgery. The first type was called the ‘Fishing Line’ or ‘Old School’ technique. The vet would basically recreate the tendon with fishing line between the two bones. Vets have been doing this surgery for years and it has worked well for dogs Brecks size for decades. The other surgery sounded a bit more intense, as the tibia would be cut and reattached backwards, to create a ledge. (Read the link for more details on the surgeries).

After the vet briefly described the surgeries, she then asked me to sit for the prices… The fishing line surgery was about $3,500 and the tibia cut surgery, would be about $4,500. Good thing she had smelling salts handy 😉 I clearly had to go home and discuss this with my hubby.

There was no doubt we were going to have to go with one of the surgeries. Unless we wanted him in a brace for the rest of his life… Nope!! He’s only 10 years old. We started getting educated about the surgery and reached out to my Mother-in-Law, as her dog just had CCL surgery done at 15 years old and recovered fabulously. Her vet only charged her $1,400! Say what?!? That is more than half the dough my vet wanted! Gimmie his number!

I wasn’t that happy with my current vet anyway.. I wondered if she even liked animals. She wouldn’t get on the floor and pet them, or give them treats before the business time of the appointment. Just the facts, ma’am.

Breck at work with me.

We got an appointment two hours after I called M-I-L’s vet. The first thing he did was to pay attention to Breck and make both of us feel comfortable. He examined his leg (on the floor) and quickly agreed with the other vet. His CCL was torn. Dr. H told me that Breck looked healthy, not overweight and the fishing line surgery would be a great surgery for him. He showed me models of dog knees and how the surgery/recovery process would go. We scheduled surgery for the next Monday.

Breck in his onsie… Hey, don’t knock it until you try it 😉

His surgery went well and according to his x-rays, it was a freak accident. He had no predisposition for this injury, nor did he have any arthritis anywhere. In my opinion, his injury was from his little, evil brother, Oreo. He likes to ‘check’ other dogs and hoomans. ‘Checking’ is a hockey term for running into another player really hard. Surely, this is what happened.

Since I knew the 8 week recovery time was going to be hell on everyone in this house, I started perusing Amazon for any products I could find to make Breck as comfortable as possible, keep him safe and help keep the hoomans sane.

Yes, we do have a real cage, however, this is not the route we wanted to take. With a cone or ‘doughnut’ on, he would not be able to turn very well in the cage. We bought a large cage enclosure to keep him in while we’re home. I am also able to take him to work with me, so he’ll basically be under surveillance 24/7. Well, except for when we slept.

We soon learned cones-of-shame were Breck’s most hated thing in the world. After cone attachment, he’d pant, shake, squirm, cry and paw at it, trying to achieve removal. We tried to be patient, however he was not having it. We next tried the doughnut. He is accepting of it while I am around him, however the minute I turn my back, its off. We tied it as tight as we thought reasonable. His neck to head ratio is nonexistent, along with his silky fur, allows for easy removal of anything around his neck. The hoomans needed to be smarter… Bandages wouldn’t help. We even tried to put a pair of daddy’s boxer underwear on him… Placing his tail through the hole. (heehee…) I won’t humiliate either of them with a photo. 😉

I finally happened upon these doggy-after-surgery onsies. I ordered a large, however I feel it was too small and now ordered an XL. Thank goodness for Amazon Prime!! Now I’ve only had it on him for a day (and it’s a bit small), but so far, I am sold! He doesn’t mind having it on and he can still lick some places, just not where his stitches are. I will have to report if this works, as he has already got one stitch out. (Overnight and into the second day, the stitches have been un-licked!)

So, now that we’ve been able to keep him from bothering his stitches, keeping his brain entertained was the next step. If you believe Cesar Millan, dogs don’t have emotions, thus do not get depressed. Really? I used to respect that man….Sigh.. Anyway. Since I believe dogs do have basic emotions, including depression, I felt I needed to figure out some activities for him to pass the time. Here’s what I came up with:

  • Long-lasting chew toys. I found these Himalayan Cheese blocks! I did not follow the directions on the package, but gave one to him right out of the package. He loves them and they take about a day or two to get through.
  • He likes to be brushed, so he’s gotten brushed daily. He also loves his face and nose rubbed with something fuzzy. He really likes massages, also.
  • Gentle tug of war. Very gentle!
  • Which cup is the treat under game. He’s too good, we’ve had to go to 4 cups.
  • Breck loves being talked to. I’m not sure how much he understands, however he is absorbed in every word I speak.
  • I normally don’t let him ‘defuzz’ a tennis ball, however he really likes doing it and it takes an hour or two to do the job.
  • He loves just sitting outside. Since we’ve been having some beautiful days lately, I’ve been enjoying the weather with him, sitting in the cool grass and relaxing.
  • He loves coconut oil. I put it on his front feet to lick off.
  • We had gotten him a few ‘Brain Games’. Basically, hide the treat type games. He’s too darn smart for these, though. Once he’s figured it out, it takes less than a minute to do it again.
  • I’ve read about others buying dog buggies to take their pooches on walks rides in. Well, I’m not going to blow a bunch of bucks on a specialized one, however I remembered the gardening cart I used when I had my own biz. He loves it!! I wheeled him through the neighborhood and he just sniffed the air. I take him out occasionally to write P-Mails on posts and mailboxes 🙂

Wanna go for a roll??

There is very little I’ll not do for my fur kids.

© Ilex ~Midwestern Plant Girl

Black Flag

I’ve had a pretty bad month. I’m hopefully going to be bouncing back soon. I’m struggling a bit on content for the blog, so I though I’d share the other side of my brain in this post. I’ve already shared my “Pep Me up! Wooo Yeah! You go girl” song (You’ve Got Another Thing Coming – By Judas Priest) Can you say MANIC?!?

Here’s the bi-polar side of things. Kings X wrote Black Flag back in 1992. I typed out the lyrics, if it’s too much metal for ya 😉 The video looks like it was made on a budget of $500 (really hoaky), but the song is great.

A year in the hole had taken its toll

When I took a good look at me

And what a surprise the scope of my eyes could only see black

And I remember someone who was taking them two by two

and lately I’d become the one who’d have laughed at you too!

There was a Black Flag on my morning

There was a Black Flag on my day

There was a Black Flag on everything around and I was walking backwards again I walked in the day, my usual way, looking through a 2 X 4

It colored my view, I couldn’t see you

Or maybe I just wouldn’t

And I remember the time when the sunlight fell on my head

And lately I’d become a member of the walking dead

There was a Black Flag on my morning

There was a Black Flag on my day

There was a Black Flag on everything around and I was walking backwards again and I know that I was wrong.

It was up to me if I wanted to see

And I remember the day when I saw the mask on my face And I knew that it was time to put the thing in its place I’d put the

Black Flag on my morning

I’d put the Black Flag on my day

I’d put the Black Flag on everything around And I was walking backwards again And I know that I was wrong 

© Ilex ~ Midwestern Plant Girl

Dog Tick ~ Dermacentor variabilis

My poor husband was attacked by a dog tick. He wasn’t anywhere that was a tick haven… He was in our yard. We do live near a forest preserve and have our share of wild furries sharing our space. Luckily, it’s not the tick vector for Lyme’s Disease. Granted, there’s other things he might be able to look forward to, like Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever and Bartonella. Yeah!

The best way to prevent a tick borne illness is to avoid tick bites. If you’re going to visit wooded areas or areas with tall grass, follow these precautions to help prevent tick bites and the risk of disease:

  • Wear light-colored, long-sleeved shirts, long trousers, boots or sturdy shoes and a head covering (ticks will jump from trees). Tuck your pants into your socks. For extra protection, tape the area where your pants and socks meet.
  • Apply insect repellent to your clothes containing 10 percent to 30 percent DEET. Use repellents containing permethrin to treat any exposed skin. Be sure to wash treated skin after coming indoors. Always follow label directions; do not misuse or overuse repellents. Always supervise children when using repellents.
  • Try to walk in the center of trails so weeds do not brush against you. If your camping area is full of leaf litter, a favorite place for ticks to hide, be sure to sit on chairs, not on the ground.
  • Check yourself every two to three hours for ticks. Most ticks don’t attach right away and rarely transmit disease until they have been attached four or more hours. Don’t forget about your fur friend! Check them for ticks, also.
  • Remove any tick you find promptly and properly! A tick’s mouth parts are barbed and can remain embedded which could lead to infection at the bite site. Do not try to burn the tick with a match, cover it with petroleum jelly or nail polish. Do not use bare hands to remove the tick because tick secretions may carry disease. The best way to remove a tick is to grasp it firmly with tweezers as close to the skin as possible and gently, but firmly, pull it straight out. Do not twist or jerk the tick. If tweezers are not available, grasp the tick with a piece of tissue or cloth or whatever can be used as a barrier between your fingers and the tick. If you want to have the tick identified, put it in a small vial of alcohol.
  • Wash the bite area thoroughly with soap and water, then apply an antiseptic to the bite site.
  • If you have an unexplained illness with fever, contact your doctor. Be sure to tell the doctor you’ve been bitten by a tick recently.

© Ilex ~ Midwestern Plant Girl

Summer Blooming Flowers 7-10-2017

Can a Monday be any better? I mean, it’s my first full week of work, after two short weeks (and a VK), stuff that middle of cake with my husband and I both getting teeth pulled this week and ice that cake with him quitting smoking and me going on a DIE-it. What’s more to love?!? Please pray to your respective god(s) for us. I pity the troll that dares to comment this week!

Here’s some pretty flowers to help cure your case of the Moandays.

Adventure with me to the past blooming flowers: 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013

     

Eupatorium perfoliatum ~ Boneset (with a Dora the Explorer sock below…)   ||   Yellow Flower!

Geranium sanguineum ~ Bloody cranesbill

Geranium sanguineum  ‘Max Frei’

Geranium sanguineum ‘Album’

     

Heuchera ~ Coral Bells     ||     A sedge ~ I learned ‘Sedges have edges’ referring to their triangular stems.

      

Campanula rotundifolia ~ Harebell   ||   Gesh, nope. nothing.

Oenothera missouriensis ~ Sundrop

© Ilex ~ Midwestern Plant Girl

Monday Memories 6-12-2017

Many of these pests / diseases are making their way around again. Be sure to monitor your plants, as many of these issues are easily dealt with in the early stages.

Ilex vs Rose Sawfly

imageLarvae can be effectively controlled with a neem oil product or an insecticidal soap. Spray only the leaves (both sides), in the morning as neem oil can possibility hurt pollinators (More research needs to go into that). The strategy is to find larvae while they are still small and before damage becomes severe, like our roses! There is no need for control after the larvae have finished eating and left the plants, give or take mid-July.

One last note, these are not caterpillars, they are actually primitive wasps, so Bt or Bacillus thuringiensis will not work.

Ilex VS Oak Wilt

Oak wilt is confused with other problems such as drought, construction stress, borers, and root problems.

These symptoms would include:Image

  • More noticeable during late summer
  • Regular size leaves, little wilting
  • Leaves browning evenly
  • Leaves remain on the tree after discoloring
  • Dying trees scattered throughout stand
  • More common on stressed sites
  • Signs of borers or root disease

Oak Wilt symptoms:

  • More noticeable during early summer
  • Small leaves, thin crown, wilting
  • Edges and tips of leaves bronzing first
  • Leaves drop soon after discoloring
  • Dying trees found in groups (root grafts)
  • Streaking and discoloration of vascular tissues

Ilex VS. Dutch Elm Disease

dutch elm diseaseThe DED fungus is spread by two insect vectors: the native elm bark beetle (Hylurgopinus rufipes) and the European elm bark beetle (Scolytus multistriatus). The fungus is transported on the beetles from infected trees to healthy trees as they feed on twigs and upper branches. The beetles lay their eggs in the bark and wood of stressed trees along with elm firewood with the bark left on. Developing larvae form channels just under the bark and the fungus grows through the galleries until it reaches the tree’s water conducting cells, or xylem. Chemicals manufactured by the tree during its effort to fight the disease plug up the xylem, causing the tree to wilt.  In the Midwest, beetles typically have two generations per year.

Ilex VS Four-Lined Plant Bug (Poecilocapus lineatus)

The four-lined plant bug (Poecilocapus lineatus) removes plant’s chlorophyll  via their piercing-sucking mouthparts. They also secrete a toxin in their saliva that digests the components responsible for holding the plant cells together that leaves a hole in the plant’s epidermis. This feeding produces white, dark, or translucent spots the plant’s leaves, which can run together forming large blotches. Leaves can turn brown, curl-up and ultimately fall off. If feeding occurs on new growth, wilting may result. This is a photo of a nymph. He was doing just fine in the damage department.

Ilex VS Eastern tent caterpillars ~ Malacosoma americanum

imageThese guys are often confused with fall webworms, and bag worms, although all three are quite different. Tent worm nests are active early in the season while webworms are active late season. Tent worms like to make their tent nests in the forks of branches, while webworm nests are located at the tips of branches. Fall webworms also enclose foliage or leaves within these nests. Tent caterpillars do not. Bag worms are single worm homes made of the foliage from the tree it has decided to call home. They mostly evergreens like junipers or arborvitae. I like to remember the difference like this… A bag can hold one, but a tent can hold many.

© Ilex ~ Midwestern plant Girl

Burn the Fields!

Since I was focusing on my front foundation plant bed for the past two years, I passed on doing my veggie garden. We tried to keep it weed free, however weeds won the battle. Late last fall, we just cut it down to a few inches tall. We are planning to have the veggie garden back this season. To prepare for this, we needed to get rid of these weeds! An easy way for us to do this was to burn them. I’m a bit of a pyro. In my younger years, I would have loved to be the firefighter that battles the wildfires. I’m too old for that, however I am certified to work prairie fires. Of course, I can still have my fun in my own yard!! 

In lieu of using the normal fire starter method used for prairie fires (diesel) we opted for a harder method, however our method would not taint the soil. We used a propane torch. It got the fire started, however because we weren’t dropping drips of fuel, which would fuel a fire so many ways better, our method relied on the dryness of the plant matter and wind. We chose a 10 MPH wind, and used it to ‘push’ the fire along the bed. It wasn’t perfect, but it got the job done.

I’m not sure where my hubby got that pink firehat. They were being given out somewhere and it had somehow got placed on the shelf near the propane torch. He thought it was apropos for the situation. I just thought it made him look cute.

Like I said, this was not exactly a wildfire! This was as good as it got. I think those flames are reaching waist height.

In case you’re wondering why we are burning our fields, in short, our area “The Great Plains”, requires a burning now and then to cleanse the non-natives from the native lands. Non-native plants and seeds usually can’t survive the heat of the fires like our natives can. Ancient Native Americans learned this long ago. If you’d like to learn more, click here.

Burn, baby, burn!

© Ilex ~ Midwestern Plant Girl

CBD Oil – A Newbies Lesson in Review

Cannabidiol (CBD) works through a number of complex mechanisms. Studies have indicated that CBD has analgesic, anti-convulsant, anti-psychotic and neuroprotective effects. This means that sufferers of chronic pain, anxiety, nausea, rheumatoid arthritis, cancer, schizophrenia, diabetes, autoimmune diseases, PTSD, alcoholism, epilepsy, strokes and cardiovascular disease have another aid in their corner.

CBD’s use to treat epilepsy has caused quite a stir among folks here recently. The video below brings hope to many people.

In short, unlike THC (9tetrahydrocannabinol), CBD does not bind to the CB1 or CB2 cannabinoid receptors, which is why it does not produce THC-like psychedelic affects.

Here in the USA, the FDA has ruled CBD to be treated as a nutritional supplement. As such, all supplements are required to have at least a basic nutritional label on them. Along with nutritional information, labels also require a suggested serving size. Because all manufacturers are required to put some form of serving size on the label, it gets confusing when it comes to dosing. This is a huge disservice to anyone trying to figure out how much CBD to take. Most people read the label and figure whatever it says is how much they should take. This couldn’t be further from the truth. The servings chosen are either arbitrary or can be helpful to some degree, however not necessarily any indication of how much CBD you should take. For instance, on many brands, 10 drops is a serving size and how many milligrams of CBD will be indicated. This is because it is important to know how many milligrams of CBD you are taking. For instance, you determine that you need 10 milligrams of CBD. The label indicates 10 drops has 5mg of CBD. You would take 20 drops to get 10mg.

CONDITION 2 – 25 LBS. 26 – 45 LBS 46 – 85 LBS 86 – 150 LBS 151 – 210 LBS 241+ LBS
MILD 4.5mg 6 mg 9 mg 12 mg 18 mg 22.5 mg
MEDIUM 6 mg 9 mg 12 mg 15 mg 22.5 mg 30 mg
SEVERE 9 mg 12 mg 15 mg 18 mg 27 mg 45 mg

 

An effective dosage can range from as little as a few milligrams of CBD-enriched oil to a gram or more. Begin with a small dose and take a few small doses over the course of the day rather than one big dose. Use the same dose and ratio for several days. Note the effects and if necessary, adjust the ratio or amount. Cannabis compounds have biphasic properties, which mean that low and high doses of the same substance can produce opposite effects. Like alcohol, small doses tend to stimulate; large doses sedate. “Less is more” is often the case with respect to cannabis therapy.

For instance: I found the best dose for my 151-210 pound frame, treating anxiety (medium condition), would be about 20-25 mg a day. I break it up by taking about 10 mg in the morning and the 10-15 mg balance at night. The lower dose in the morning is treated like coffee by my body, and the larger dose at night works like warm milk… allowing me a great night’s sleep.

Things to look for when choosing a CBD oil:

  • Cannabis Not Industrial Hemp: Compared to whole plant cannabis, hemp is typically low in cannabinoid content. A huge amount of hemp is required to extract a small amount of CBD, raising the risk of contaminants because hemp is a bioaccumulator, meaning it draws toxins from the soil. The balanced profile of whole plant cannabis enhances the therapeutic benefits of the CBD and THC.
  • How it’s made: a 10% CBD oil that has been CO2 extracted and processed without heat so it maintains a full cannabinoid and terpene profile, is better than a 50% oil cheaply extracted with butane and heated excessively so it has no more terpenes left. Also, many products are made with isolate, which is 99%. Very high %, but it is an isolate so it’s missing the rest of the “whole plant” compounds and therefore, likely to be limited in effects.
  • Easy to Read Labels: Look for clear labels showing the quantity, ratio of CBD, THC per dose (if applicable), a manufacturing date and lastly, a batch number.
  • Lab Testing: Look for products that are tested for consistency, verified as free of mold, pesticides, bacteria, solvent residues and other contaminants.
  • Quality Ingredients: Select products with quality ingredients. No corn syrup, GMOs, trans fats, and artificial additives.
  • CBD and THC-Rich Products: For maximum therapeutic impact, (If living in a Marijuana legal state) choose products that include CBD and THC, the main psychoactive component of cannabis. CBD and THC enhance each other’s therapeutic benefits, that’s why Mother Nature put them together 😉
  • Safe Extraction: Avoid products extracted with toxic solvents like BHO (Butane honey oil), propane, hexane or other hydrocarbons. Solvent residues are especially dangerous for immune-compromised patients. Look for products that use a safer method of extraction like supercritical CO2.

Here are some of the brands I tried and my notes. In the end, Diamond CBD will be getting my business.

PRODUCT PRICE SIZE MG TASTE RATING
Honey B $30.00 1 oz / 30 ml 100 mg Berry My starter bottle. I really liked the mild taste. Only 3 flavors.
Tasty Drops $60.00 1 oz / 30ml 300 mg Berry Thick black oil. Did not like the thick ‘hemp’ taste.
American Shaman $60.00 .5 oz / 15ml 300 mg Grape Strong hemp flavor, but grape covered well.
Pure Science Lab $60.00 .5 oz / 15ml 400 mg Vanilla Horrible taste. Lingered for hours. Required refrigeration.
Diamond CBD $70.00 .5 oz / 15ml 350 mg Cherry Best tasting so far. Nice dropper. Have different flavors on order.

© Ilex ~ Midwestern Plant Girl

A Broken Tree ~ Why Arborist’s Cry

imageWe were camping at one of our local campgrounds last October and this tree was on our site. I normally love to put supporting links to old posts in my blog, however I’m going to be anonymous on this one. For us, this campground is close (under an hour drive) and is on a river we like to kayak on. Sadly though, they don’t care for their campground whatsoever. Almost every tree in the campground is injured in one way or another. Many are ready to fall on campers with a good gust of wind! I cringe when I see these situations, as what am I to do? Tell the family of 6 to move their camper now, before you lose a few of your chitlins from a downed tree? I’d get a “Pffft, we’re fine, you crazy lady!” Yeah, don’t mind the lady with the ‘Risk Assessment Arborist’ badge on her lapel. =-P

I’ve pondered highly about saying something to the owners of such campgrounds. I would think that they would love the free information from a licensed arborist! Of course, I can give constructive criticism without being accusatory. No one wants to be told they don’t know what they’re doing  😉 However, I’ve done this once with nasty repercussions. I was at a campground that had poison ivy everywhere in spades! Some hung into the paths that people walk on. I mentioned this to the owner, who told me, “What am I supposed to do about it?” I said that there are landscapers that care for these types of situations and his reply was that he didn’t have the money to do it and people will just have to avoid it. I told him he could put up a sign that identifies the area and show folks what poison ivy looks like. He said he didn’t want people to be afraid to camp there and campers should know what PI looks like! This campground was charging $67 a night, without sewer. This is an outrageous fee, for you non-campers. Normal rates are about $30-$40, with sewer, at a private campground. The sad part is that this is the campground a close, family friend decided to drop their seasonal trailer on, and gives us grief that we don’t come up there and camp with them.

Sometimes, there’s really no risk involved in the landscape. Many times it’s just a plant health problem or an aesthetic thang.

image     image     image

Take a look at the photos of this tree… From a layman’s perspective, it may not look like there are any issues at all. However, upon further inspection, do you notice how large the trunk is compared to the canopy of the tree? A few years ago, the top of this tree broke off. Then the tree sent out a bunch of shoots from the broken trunk to compensate for the loss of its food-making leaves. These branches are not attached to the tree very well and can break with little effort. As you can see, many of the branches are dying already.

The last photo is of the root-crown and how it was planted. This tree had little chance from day one of ever surviving. It was buried too deep and has multiple girdling roots, which are roots that circle the trunk and only get tighter as the tree grows, cutting off its circulation, in laymen’s terms.

Can this tree be saved? No. Its structure has been so compromised, there’s really no way to prune it back to a healthy shape.

Just like Prince sang, “This is what is sounds like…. when Arborists cry.”  😉


© Ilex – Midwestern Plant Girl

House Finch Eye Disease ~ Mycoplasmal conjunctivitis

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House Finch eye disease, Mycoplasmal conjunctivitis (MC) was first noticed in 1994 in the New England area. The disease later spread to states along the East Coast, and has now been reported throughout most of eastern North America, as far north as Quebec, Canada, as far south as Florida, and as far west as California.

Birds infected with this disease have swollen, red, runny, or crusty eyes. In extreme cases, the eyes become swollen shut and the bird becomes blind. While infected birds can recover, many die from starvation or predation.

Although infected bird’s symptoms show in the eyes, the disease is primarily a respiratory infection. It is caused by a strain of the MC bacterium, Mycoplasma gallisepticum. The bacterium poses no known health threat to humans.

MC has affected domestic turkeys and chickens for a long time. The disease also inflicts several other wild bird species including, Purple Finch, American Goldfinch, Evening Grosbeak.

There are treatments out there for this disease, however it is illegal to posses a wild bird. The best way to reduce the potential spread of MG and other feeder-bird diseases is to observe the following guidelines:

  • Clean feeders and bird baths every two weeks with a 10 percent bleach solution.
  • Use fresh seed, and keep the ground area around the feeder as clean as possible. During the summer, rake the area to remove accumulated seeds/shells under the feeder. During the winter, shovel fresh snow over the area.
  • Use nonporous plastic, metal, or glass feeders that are easy to clean, and offer ample feeder space to reduce crowding.
  • Keep platform feeders clean and only offer a day’s worth of seed.

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© Ilex – Midwestern Plant Girl