Tag Archive | macro

Juvenile Male Cardinal ~ Cardinalis cardinalis

Happy Valentines Day!

I though today would be a great day to write about cardinals.

Cardinals are monogamous birds whose relationships with their spouses are harmonious, romantic and musical. The male and female sing duets, calling similar songs to each other. Native American lore says if a cardinal crosses your path or attracts your attention, and you’re single, there may be a romantic relationship in your near future. If you’re already in a relationship, you may experience renewed romance and courtship. If you or your partner have been unfaithful, monogamy is the cardinal’s message

     

Cardinals make a distinct ‘chirp’, that my ears pick-up quickly. I was home writing posts, when I heard the call. This little guy was under the suet puck I have hanging from a shepherd’s hook. Mr. Squirrel was up on the puck, gobbling and dropping a lot of crumbs. Perfect situation for Mr. Cardinal! I crept up to the window and looked down, hoping not to spook him. The cardinals at work are very skittish. Any movement at all has them flying off. This guy here had no fear. As long as the crumbs rain down on him, he was happy and not worried about who looked at him.

Cardinalis cardinalis is what’s called a tautonym: zoological names of species consisting of two identical words (the generic name and the specific name have the same spelling). Such names are allowed in zoology, however not in botany. Clearly, like I’ve said before, botanist’s are EVIL!!! Click here to see the long list of tautonyms available from the Wiki. Some of my favorites: Bison bison, Chinchilla chinchilla, Iguana iguana, Gorilla gorilla. 😉

My gift to you on Valentine’s day; a romantic Native American legend.

The Red Bird

A Choctaw Legend

Once, when time was not quite old enough to be counted, there lived a beautiful Indian maiden. This was a special maiden. She could do all the work that needed to be done to keep her lodge in order and to satisfy her mate. But this maiden did not have what she longed for — her mate. As she sat under the large tree one day, she heard the Red Bird.

“Red Bird, is it so strange for me to wish to have someone to care for, who will care for me?” asked the maiden. “If it is not so strange, why have I not found that one meant for me?”

The Red Bird had no answer for the Indian maiden, but he sat and listened to her because he could hear the lonely in her voice. Every morning for the passing of seven suns, the Red Bird came and listened to the maiden’s story. As each day passed, the loneliness felt by the maiden began to fill the Red Bird.

One day in the Red Bird’s far travels, he came to a handsome Indian brave. The brave saw the Red Bird and called him to him. As he began to talk, the Red Bird felt the loneliness in his voice that the maiden had shown. Soon the Red Bird began to see that these two lonely people had the same wish, to find another who would love and care for them as they would care for their mate.

On the fifth day of listening to the brave, the Red Bird became as a bird that is sick. The brave became concerned, for the Red Bird had become his friend. As the brave walked toward him, the Red Bird began hopping, leading the brave to the lodge of the Indian maiden. Because the brave was wanting to see if the Red Bird was alright, he did not notice that he was going from his home. The Red Bird saw the Indian maiden sitting outside of her lodge and when he came very close to where he knew the brave would then see the Indian maiden, he flew away. The brave saw the Indian maiden and realized that he had wandered far from his home. He went to the Indian maiden to ask where he was.

The Red Bird sat in the tree and watched the brave and the maiden. At first the brave was shy and the maiden would not talk, but they soon were talking and laughing like old friends.

Red Bird saw this and thought it was good. He had done as he could and now it would be up to the brave and the maiden. As Red Bird flew to his home he thought of how Great Spirit had known that someday the two would find each other. Now it was good, thought Red Bird, that maiden had someone who would see for her and brave had someone that would hear for him and that they finally had someone who would care.

© Ilex ~ Midwestern Plant Girl

Savannah Blooming Flowers 1-1-2017

Happy JANUARY blooming flowers!! 😉 I know, that you know, that I know nothing blooms in Illinois, in January… Well, maybe an occasional Lenten rose… Or a houseplant… However, I was in Savannah, Georgia recently and all of these colorful blooms were here to meet me! Of course, I took photos of everything that had any color in the landscape, so there are some berries and seeds also.

A technique I use to identify things is knowing when something is in bloom. Folks will ask, “What’s the beautiful, blue flower I see blooming now (say May).” I know that the  pulmonaria family blooms then, show them a photo and they gasp, “YES!” Here in Savannah, it’s 3 zones different that me (me = 5 – here = 7/8), things aren’t blooming at the same time they bloom up North. I had to go on my botany skills… that flowers have families and knowing their ‘shapes’, I could get close on identifying them. I’m not going to go crazy trying to identify them, but if you know one I don’t, give a shout out in the comments.

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I’m going to start off strong with one I should be able to ID in any situation! Ilex verticillata ~ Winterberry  || I’m not sure of this one, but it has a salvia type flower and was a bush.

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Camellia japonica ~ So beautiful!!   ||  Strawberries anyone?

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Tradescantia ohiensis ~ Spiderwort    ||   A Rudbeckia ~ Black Eyed Susan

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Pentas lanceolata ~ We use these in our flower displays (as an annual), not sure if it actually grows here, or is used as an annual also.   || Woohoo! Azaleas! There were some blooming, but not all. I hear coming here in March is the best time for blooms.

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More Azalea    ||   I know this in the oenothera family, because the 5 star stigma is a trait of that family.

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Beautiful moss

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An avens, perhaps?

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Liverleaf Hepatica ~ Hepatica americana

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I’m not sure at all about this first one   ||   This one is in the aster family

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Lantana camara ~ Invasive here.

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Agave bracteosa ~ Variegated Agave   ||  A Honeysuckle

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I had to look this up, as I did have a Sago palm (cycas revoluta) at my house in Florida. Mine must have never bloomed before. This one is a female and that center is called megasporophylls. In typical male fashion, he blooms with a large spike.

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Looks like an annual?    ||   Another beautiful Camellia

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Variegated ginger    ||    More Camellias!!

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A ligularia of some sort, very cool   ||  More azaleas

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Nice to have spice right outside the door!

© Ilex – Midwestern Plant Girl

The Last of the Blooming Flowers 11-16-2015 Quiz!

I was out looking at my front foundation bed I planted this past year. I was pleasantly surprised to see some color still showing off in the garden. Some of these perennials have continued blooming and some have just bloomed out of nowhere land. I was thinking I would make a quiz out of it for my faithful followers…. See if you guys are really reading my posts or just hitting the like button 😉

I’ve read about writing tests. In a multiple choice question, two answers should be close, but truly not possibly right. The other two should make enough sense to be right, but if the material was understood, only one answer is clearly correct. I’ve written my test in this fashion.

So, are these following photos of flowers blooming out of sequence (no where near their correct bloom time) or are the blooms in sequence for this late season (these are late blooming flowers)? Note that the Midwest has had pretty mild weather this late summer into fall. It’s been an average of 50F/10C high and a low of 36F/3C.

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Centarea

  1. I bloom now.
  2. I normally don’t bloom now.
  3. Nice windmill.
  4. Don King called, he’s suing over hairstyle rights.

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Dianthus

  1. I bloom now.
  2. I normally don’t bloom now.
  3. This is a cactus!
  4. This porcupine is wearing a cute hat.

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Knautia

  1. I bloom now.
  2. I normally don’t bloom now.
  3. What? I’m not knautia, I’m a mum!
  4. Shhh, I’m a dandelion with a punk hairstyle.

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Gailardia

  1. I bloom now.
  2. I normally don’t bloom now.
  3. I’m a bulls eye, not a flower.
  4. I am a sunset.

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Anemone

  1. I bloom now.
  2. I normally don’t bloom now.
  3. You’re thinking of my cousin, the other anemone…
  4. Shouldn’t I be in the ocean?

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Geum

  1. I bloom now.
  2. I normally don’t bloom now.
  3. I’m a poppy for Veteran’s Day.
  4. I’m a colorful fall leaf.

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Echinacea

  1. I bloom now.
  2. I normally don’t bloom now.
  3. Look! Squirrel!
  4. I think I want my lawyer.

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Clematis

  1. I bloom now.
  2. I normally don’t bloom now.
  3. I’m a starfish.
  4. I’m a wad of bubble gum.

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Violet

  1. I bloom now.
  2. I normally don’t bloom now.
  3. I’m schizophrenic and so am I
  4. Don’t think about answering, just look at my cute face.

 

Answers:

Centaurea = 2 – I usually only bloom in June.

Dianthus = 2 – I usually only bloom in May through June.

Knautia = 1 – I start blooming in July and go through September.

Gaillardia = 1 & 2 – They aren’t supposed to be blooming now, however I’ve usually had them bloom in a longer window than published.

Anemone = 1 – Although a tad late, I will still say this is a late blooming flower.

Geum = 2 – I usually bloom May through June. This one bloomed all season.

Echinacea = 1 -Yes, a true late bloomer!

Clematis = 1 – I bloom twice a year starting in May through June then again in September.

Violet = 2 – I usually bloom April through May. I think I was confused in the cold weather.

 

So, how did you do? Please post your results in the comment section.

© Ilex – Midwestern Plant Girl

Summery Blooming Flowers 7-25-2014

Finally, Fooking Friday!! Hope everyone has a wonderful weekend!!

Click HERE to see what was blooming last year!

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Shirley in the aster fam, leucanthemum formerly chrysanthemum… was in someone’s yard.

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Dianthus (?)

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Veronica ‘First Lady’ – Speedwell

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Echinacea ‘Pink Double Delight’ – coneflower

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MMMMMMMMMMMMMM…

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POP!
Lupinus densiflorus – Lupine

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Carex pensylvanica – Sedge

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Phlox – not sure of variety

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Astrantia major ‘Roma’ – masterwort

These are a new favorite of mine.

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Astrantia major ‘Vanilla gorilla’ – masterwort

© Ilex – Midwestern Plants