Tag Archive | society

Thanksgiving: A Day of Mourning 2017

Every Thanksgiving, I like to republish this post and add a few thoughts.

My thoughts surround the removal of Confederate statues. I am against the removal for the fact that the act is removing history from our memories, just as what happened to Thanksgiving. I know most folks think that these statues are tributes to these leaders that fought for things that us modern folks aren’t too proud of. Some folks think they are offensive. Contrary to what many people believe, slavery was not high on the list of reasons for the Civil War.

Although some people think that black Africans were the only slaves in written history, slavery goes back to the beginning of time,  and spans all cultures, nationalities and religions. I don’t understand why some folks think this statement is considered racist. It’s the truth! It may not be easy to find collaborating documents to prove the many different peoples that were used as slaves, as much of this history has been buried in history books, because countries don’t want to be remembered that way. That’s a problem, in my opinion. People will soon forget about why the Civil War was fought and the people that are claiming to be repressed because of it will loose their footing in their arguments.

‘Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.’ George Santayana

“There aren’t just bad people that commit genocide; we are all capable of it. It’s our evolutionary history.” James Lovelock

thanks not

‘History is written by the victors.’ Winston S. Churchill 

If you are interested in learning a different story of what happened after the pilgrims reached Plymouth Rock, please read on!

Those who are indigenous Indians to North America have been misrepresented and effectively banished in American history textbooks in favor of glorifying European colonialism. Why does democracy refuse to teach that thousands of American Native Indians were unjustifiably slaughtered in the name of conquest and imperialism?

From the book The American Tradition.

“After some exploring in 1620, the Pilgrims chose the land around Plymouth Harbor for their settlement. Unfortunately, they arrived in December and were not prepared for the New England weather. However, they were aided by friendly Indians, who gave them food and showed them how to grow corn. When warm weather came, the colonists planted, fished, hunted and prepared themselves for the next winter. After harvesting their first crop, they and their Indian friends celebrated the first Thanksgiving.”

This is what is taught here in the U.S. Some of it is the truth; the Pilgrims did come to America in 1620. Most didn’t survive the first winter because of their lack of stored food and supplies. They did meet Native American Indians. That’s pretty much where the truth ends.

The Wampanoag people did not truly trust whites, having dealt with European fishermen who had enslave or kill them for the past 100 years. However, because it was their culture and religion to help those in need, the Wampanoags took pity on the settlers and helped them. On March 16th, 1621, a Patuxet Indian (neighbors of the Wampanoag) named Samoset met the settlers for the first time. Samoset spoke excellent English, as did Squanto, another bilingual Patuxet because the British had taken them into slavery in the past. Squanto acted as an interpreter for the Wampanoag Indians, led by Chief Massasoit.

The next harvest season, the settlers and Native Tribes agreed to meet for a 3-day negotiation. As the meeting fell during the Wampanoag Harvest Festival, the Native Indian community agreed to bring most of the food for the event. The peace and land negotiations were successful and the Pilgrims acquired the rights of land for their people. This became the base for the Thanksgiving story.

In 1622 propaganda started to circulate about this “First Thanksgiving”. A book called, “Mourt’s Relation: A Journal of the Pilgrims in Plymouth” publicized the greatness of Plymouth and told of the meeting as a friendly feast with the Native Indians. The Pilgrims glamorized the situation, possibly in an effort to encourage more Puritans to settle in their area. By stating that the Native Indian community was warm and open-armed, the newcomers would be more likely to feel secure in their journey to New England.

What started as a hope for peace between the settlers and the Wampanoag, ended in the most sad and tragic way. The Pilgrims, once few in number, had now grown to well over 40,000 and the Native American Indian strength had weakened to less than 3,000. Not only did the battles lower their numbers, contagious diseases never seen by the Native Indians were also to blame. By 1675, one generation later, tension had grown between the Europeans and the Native Indians. The Wampanoag called in reinforcements from other surrounding tribes.

Many Native Indian communities throughout Massachusetts and Connecticut rallied with the Wampanoags, but the power of the English was overpowering. After the war was over, the remaining Wampanoags and their allies, were either killed or deported as slaves for thirty shillings each. This slave trade was so successful that several Puritan ship owners began a slave-trading business by raiding the coast for Native American Indians and trading them for black slaves of Africa. The black slaves were then sold to colonists in the south. Hence, the Pilgrims were one of the founders of the American-based slave trading industry.

This is why I will not be celebrating Thanksgiving the same way as in the past. I will still be thankful for my friends and my family. However, I will also remember there’s more than one way to weave a story.

© Ilex ~ Midwestern Plant Girl

Thanksgiving: A Day of Mourning

I like to reblog this yearly.

There aren’t just bad people that commit genocide; we are all capable of it. It’s our evolutionary history.

James Lovelock

If you are interested in learning a different story of what happened after the pilgrims reached Plymouth Rock, please read on!

thanks not

Winston S. Churchill — ‘History is written by the victors.’

Those who are indigenous Indians to North America have been misrepresented and effectively banished in American history textbooks in favor of glorifying European colonialism. Why does democracy refuse to teach that thousands of American Native Indians were unjustifiably slaughtered in the name of conquest and imperialism?

From the book The American Tradition.

“After some exploring in 1620, the Pilgrims chose the land around Plymouth Harbor for their settlement. Unfortunately, they arrived in December and were not prepared for the New England weather. However, they were aided by friendly Indians, who gave them food and showed them how to grow corn. When warm weather came, the colonists planted, fished, hunted and prepared themselves for the next winter. After harvesting their first crop, they and their Indian friends celebrated the first Thanksgiving.”

This is what is taught here in the U.S. Some of it is the truth; the Pilgrims did come to America in 1620. Most didn’t survive the first winter because of their lack of stored food and supplies. They did meet Native American Indians. That’s pretty much where the truth ends.

The Wampanoag people did not truly trust whites, having dealt with European fishermen who had enslave or kill them for the past 100 years. However, because it was their culture and religion to help those in need, the Wampanoags took pity on the settlers and helped them. On March 16th, 1621, a Patuxet Indian (neighbors of the Wampanoag) named Samoset met the settlers for the first time. Samoset spoke excellent English, as did Squanto, another bilingual Patuxet because the British had taken them into slavery in the past. Squanto acted as an interpreter for the Wampanoag Indians, led by Chief Massasoit.

The next harvest season, the settlers and Native Tribes agreed to meet for a 3-day negotiation. As the meeting fell during the Wampanoag Harvest Festival, the Native Indian community agreed to bring most of the food for the event. The peace and land negotiations were successful and the Pilgrims acquired the rights of land for their people. This became the base for the Thanksgiving story.

In 1622 propaganda started to circulate about this “First Thanksgiving”. A book called, “Mourt’s Relation: A Journal of the Pilgrims in Plymouth” publicized the greatness of Plymouth and told of the meeting as a friendly feast with the Native Indians. The Pilgrims glamorized the situation, possibly in an effort to encourage more Puritans to settle in their area. By stating that the Native Indian community was warm and open-armed, the newcomers would be more likely to feel secure in their journey to New England.

What started as a hope for peace between the settlers and the Wampanoag, ended in the most sad and tragic way. The Pilgrims, once few in number, had now grown to well over 40,000 and the Native American Indian strength had weakened to less than 3,000. Not only did the battles lower their numbers, contagious diseases never seen by the Native Indians were also to blame. By 1675, one generation later, tension had grown between the Europeans and the Native Indians. The Wampanoag called in reinforcements from other surrounding tribes.

Many Native Indian communities throughout Massachusetts and Connecticut rallied with the Wampanoags, but the power of the English was overpowering. After the war was over, the remaining Wampanoags and their allies, were either killed or deported as slaves for thirty shillings each. This slave trade was so successful that several Puritan ship owners began a slave-trading business by raiding the coast for Native American Indians and trading them for black slaves of Africa. The black slaves were then sold to colonists in the south. Hence, the Pilgrims were one of the founders of the American-based slave trading industry.

This is why I will not be celebrating Thanksgiving the same way as in the past. I will still be thankful for my friends and my family. However, I will also remember there’s more than one way to weave a story.

If You Can’t Be Bad Ass, At Least Look Bad Ass

Many times in the big, scary world we live in, there are times we need to defend ourselves from the big, scary things out there. Now, without getting all logical and deep… We can all probably agree that:

  • All things aren’t what they seem
  • Some things can seem what they are

So, the problem is in figuring out who is telling the truth and who is fibbing…

image

Sonchus asper ~ sharp-fringed sow thistle, prickly sow-thistle spiny sow thistle, or spiny-leaved sow thistle DON’T TOUCH!!

image

Sonchus oleraceus ~ common sowthistle, sow thistle, smooth sow thistle, annual sow thistle, hare’s colwort, hare’s thistle, milky tassel, swinies. EAT ME!!

 

Here is a case of imitation. They are in the same family, however one would really hurt your pie-hole if you were to eat it, where the other would be a nice, fresh addition to your salad.

This is also akin to the cutie thirteen line squirrel.. Who knew he was going to attack a house sparrow!

Don’t judge a book by it’s cover and know there are many look-alikes out there, so beware!

 

 

 

image

Aieeee! They all look alike!!

© Ilex ~ Midwestern Plant Girl

The Plumber Saves the Day

Do you know who saves more lives than doctors?Plumber-Protects

The plumber has one of the most important jobs in our society and is someone we couldn’t do without. At some point in our lives we will all have to call on the help of a plumber. Their skills are varied and vital in the running of our homes and businesses. There has been a stigma attached to being a plumber lately and many people now see the plumber as the new lawyer or doctor, in terms of their salary and general importance in society. However, what makes a good plumber hasn’t changed over the years. It’s not in the desire to be rich* but the desire to use their hands to do their job well.

Professor Kotlikoff, president of Economic Security Planning Incorporated states, “Yes, doctors have a bigger salary.  But, doctors have to endure nearly a decade of expensive education before making any real salary, after which the doctor is hit by a very high progressive tax rate.  Because of all the costs the doctor incurs, the taxes and the lost wages, plumbers make more, and have almost the same spending power over their lifetime as general practitioners.”

Here’s my hubby, workin’ for a livin’!

image

image

  • Believe me, if he was making that much money, I’d be a “stay-at-home-dog-mom!!”

My Little Angels and The Neighboring Devils

image

Ryder and Buford

My neighbors are a pair of bloodhounds, Buford and Ryder. They are very large boys at about 150 pounds a piece. Buford is five, Ryder is two. Buford’s dad was the Guinness Book of World Records ‘Longest Ears on a Dog’ at almost 14″ or 34cm each!

image

Thank goodness they own the chew toy fence. Their daddy had to go aaaaall the around with an extra board and nail it to e v e r y board, as these guys have come through the fence a few times. We’ve even had to prop it up in a few spots.
image

They are diggers also!

image

Ready? Ready? GO!

Oreo and Buford go way back. They have some odd Hatfield–McCoy feud going on. Up and down the fence they race, barking and smashing their faces into the openings. I get it. Oreo is thinking, “This is my yard.There are many like it, but this one is mine. It is my life. I must master it as I must master my life….”

image

That is a mug only a mother can love.

image

Breck doesn’t get the whole fascination of running the fence.

You Didn’t Say, “Dibby-Dabs!”

While growing-up we all learn many lessons. In my house, a powerful lesson is to say “Dibby-dabs” when you are leaving your seat to ‘save’ it when you came back. If you forget to say it, you just lost your seat.
image

As you can see, I forgot to say Dibby-dabs.

Copyright – Ilex Farrell

Gremlin Bell For Safe Travel

image

Saint Christopher for my hubby’s car! He’s the saint for travelers.

Have you noticed that some motorists have a small bell hanging in their car?  Have you wondered what the purpose was? That little bell is more than just a decoration, it serves a very important purpose – it wards off gremlins, also known as evil road spirits.

You see, there are motor vehicle gremlins that LOVE speed, however they are also mischievous little devils and they cause all sorts of problems for you while you are driving.  Some say they are responsible for that old lady in the minivan cutting you off in traffic… Or, you may be having trouble shifting smoothly, your battery goes dead, your turn signal suddenly refuses to work, an oil spill appears out of nowhere, or you hit a patch of black ice – you get the idea.  Those little gremlins look for trouble and try to steer your vehicle towards it.

Do not fear for your hooptie – Place a bell somewhere it can freely ring, as it wards off these attacks from the little gremlins.  If you already have some gremlins riding with you, they become trapped in the hollow of the bell and the constant ringing drives them insane – causing them to lose their grip and fall to the roadway. And that is also where potholes come from!

If you buy a gremlin bell of your own, the power works.  If you receive the gremlin bell as a gift – the powerful magic of the bell is doubled.

** The original Gremlin Bell’s are for motorcycles, however I think a gremlin is a gremlin!

Chimera Rose – The Story of a Single Twin

A chimera (also spelled chimaera) is a single organism composed of genetically distinct cells.

According to Greek mythology, the chimera is a monstrous fire-breathing hybrid creature of Lycia in Asia Minor, composed of the parts many animals. They are frequently portrayed as a female lion with the head of a goat arising from the back, sometimes including a dragon, and a tail that ends with a snake’s head. The Chimera was one of the offspring of Typhon and Echidna and a sibling of such monsters as Cerberus and the Lernaean Hydra.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

However, in real life, chimeras happen to all plants and animals, including humans.

We know that fraternal twins arise from two fertilized eggs that develop into nonidentical twins. However, sometimes these two zygotes overlap and fuse so completely as to develop into one body with two distinct sets of DNA, a phenomenon called tetragametic chimerism. Basically, Freaky Friday, but double-time the FREAKY!

cardinal chimera3Mike-S

This happens well before any of the embryonic stem cells in the zygote are defined as ‘liver’, ‘leg’ or ‘skin’ (etc). So, while this special person(s) is baking in mom’s womb, the ‘together but separate’ cells start making a complete human. The interesting part is that one set of cells will develop into a part (say the heart) and other parts will be developed by the other zygote’s cells. This human will be complete in every way; however, some of their parts will have different DNA. It is possible to have a heart with one DNA and a kidney with another DNA in one person. Many times chimerism is seen physically, such as having two different colored eyes or skin markings/mosaics.

Many times people don’t even know they are a chimera unless a medical need for DNA testing becomes necessary or perhaps a question of paternity comes up. Mother’s needing an organ transplant have been told that their tested children are not theirs and there have even been parents taken to court over custody and welfare fraud because DNA of the children and parents did not match.

Chimeras in plants have been being developed before there was a clear understanding of what was happening. African Violets have been genetically played with for decades.

Here is rose that I noticed had the chimera trait. Notice how the one right next to it is one color? It can be that random.
image

© Ilex – Midwestern Plants